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  • Colour Palettes

    According to Elle Home the results for the coming year are in…..

    Of all the design trends we look forward to most in the coming year, color holds a steady spot at the top of our list. After all, it sets the tone for what furniture we buy, what decor we invest in, and the overall mood for that design year.

    Sherwin-Williams predicts that 2018 will embody the spirit of contemporary life with their three colour palettes: Affinity, Connectivity, and Sincerity. Each one is inspired by the collective culture of the moment — from fashion to technology — and captures the aura of a year that is bound to be full of progress.

    Read on for the inspiration behind the brand's 36 colour predictions for the year ahead, and maybe even get a jumpstart!

     

    Affinity

    This colour story of striking blue, animated fuchsia, and stabilizing brown, the Affinity palette is set to celebrate the connection of people and places.

    “We’re remapping our sense of community, landlocked cities are becoming global hubs of crafts and gastronomy,” says Wadden, Sherwin-Williams' Director of Marketing. “Home and car sharing, as well as e-learning, have created a culture of everyday nomadism and the wanderlust-obsessed.”

    Affinity is just like any good getaway: relaxed but full of unexpected fun. Decorate accordingly with a base of neutral browns and vibrant accent colors in an array of pinks and blues

    Connectivity

    The Connectivity palette draws from innovations in tech, including pixelated oranges, digital blues and greens, and high-def yellow.

    “In Silicon Valley, Austin, Berlin and Beijing, techies are the new hippies, full of breakthrough ideas and utopian ideals,” Wadden says. “Connectivity is modern and playful, bringing in dark watery tones of blue that are balanced with neutrals, warm yellow and energetic purples.”

    Sincerity

    Minimalism isn't going anywhere in 2018. However, it is taking on a less structured look.

    “With the Sincerity palette, silence is no longer empty, but instead is rare and rich with possibility,” says Wadden. “Sincerity is about mindful living and creating an environment to disconnect and recharge. Soft, washed neutrals, greens and sanctuary pinks work together to create harmony.”

    Step away from the stark light and dark contrasts and embrace colour fluidity. This palette is all about ditching harsh lines for sandy browns, muted greys, and hazy greens that harmonize perfectly. Don't stress too much about sticking to a strict colour scheme, but instead let one organic shade blend into the next.

    Citation:

    By Sara Tardiff
    Jun 13, 2017
    2.4k
    http://www.elledecor.com/design-decorate/color/a10011137/color-trends-2018/

    Natural softer, earthy colours are all set to take interior design schemes into the next year and what could be more ‘natural’ for pubs, clubs and restaurants than to choose colours that blend and are harmonious together.  For a couple of reasons. Firstly, that they suit our customers and our buildings.  In the main our building have a sense of historical reference and a muted palette will enhance and balance these natural elements to our existing framework.  The second reason is slightly more practical – as business people we don’t want to be refurbishing – repainting or re-financing every time fashion changes.  Our colour schemes need to stand the test of time, looking fresh, tasteful and current for a good while. Happily the fashionistas for 2018 agree!!

  • Extra Covers for Christmas

    The annual ‘It’ll soon be Christmas’ time has arrived and together with it comes the anticipation of a festive bonanza for our pubs, clubs and restaurants as customers head out for office parties and festive family halfway present swaps.

    The headache has started for some venues- thinking about how to accommodate all those extra bums on seats which should be a reason for unabashed celebrating but of course comes with a certain amount of trepidation as customers at this time of the year become even more demanding.

    One of the biggest bug bears is either not being able to sit altogether or the tables being such differing sizes that the whole party looks like a mish mash and there’s a real danger of losing all the cutlery between the gaps!

    It’s a relief for venues to know a solution is close to hand. Pub Stuff tables naturally butt up together giving seamless results to extra long tables for seating parties.  Whether this is in a function room or as part of your main bar just pull them together and decorate like Martha Stewart!

    All Pub Stuff tables are held in stock at our huge stock warehouse near Banbury for central distribution nationwide. Quick turnaround and bargain prices mean those extra covers are easily achieved and beautifully resolved.

  • Retro or Vintage but probably not Antique?

    I’m pretty sure everyone knows that an Antique is generally something over 100 years old. At least that’s’ the general understanding.  But Retro and Vintage are words commonly banded about when it comes to trying to describe a style of furniture design and the lines here are a little more blurred.

    A Vintage piece normally has a specific age line alongside such as a Vintage 1960’s Mercedes and the word itself comes from the French word vendage meaning the ‘grapes picked during a season’ or a secondary definition of a ‘period of origin or manufacture’. Ideally this would mean the very best examples of a piece reflecting a period- something you could look at and ‘date’ by the very style of its shape or perhaps even its colouring. A precious reminder of an era.

    Retro furniture does not need to look old fashioned...

    Retro can be a bit more fluid but essentially shoudn’t just look old fashioned or out dated which is altogether less attractive. For example, deliberately including a paisley brown floral wallpaper in a 1970’s retro scheme (cool) is not the same as not having redecorated since 1979 (yuk)! Sometimes ironic, it’s a difficult look to pull off and takes a confident operator to reflect a retro style as it often refers to high fashion from a period; which can induce a love it or hate it reaction depending on how your customers feel about the 1980’s or 1990’s for example, or whether indeed it has any relevance to their lives at all.

    "Vintage style furniture is all the rage"

    In my mind Vintage probably predates the 1960’s, with the high style and ‘Mary Quant’ geometrics easing style into a Retro look. However, that’s just me!

    Of course, with age comes wear and tear, and in the current climate it’s not OK to have chairs looking stylishly distressed but unsafe to sit on. So, furniture manufacturers such as Pub Stuff are concentrating on replicating Vintage and Retro looks using modern manufacturing techniques designing ‘vintage’ and ‘retro’ style features into products to allow operators to create the ‘feel ‘ without the worry of furniture being unserviceable or not conforming to modern fire regulations.

  • Millennial Style

    Spending in the UK leisure sector, including eating and drinking out in bars, cafes and restaurants, was driven by 18 to 34-year olds in the last quarter of 2016 reports Deloitte. These millennials are showing increased consumer confidence and follows a period of favourable conditions such as low interest rates, low inflation and low unemployment figures, leaving them feeling generally positive with enough disposable income to justify spending on non-essential leisure activities.

    Deloitte continued “It is reassuring to see that younger consumers have not been put off by political uncertainties, and have continued to spend their money on leisure activities, such as dining out.”

     

    Busy lifestyles contribute to eating out and the choices of venue are endless:

    Cafes have traditionally evolved from the French word for Coffee and serving coffee often remains the primary focus supplemented by snack food or light bites.  The massive increase in the number of outlets describing themselves as Coffee Bars has encroached into the Café estate reflecting our ongoing and ever more complex need for coffee in all its guises. The delicate merger of these two descriptive entities is often only delignated by the visual style of the venue.

    As venues capitalise and make the very most of the time they are open, many now ‘morph’ from a day time to an evening venue. Dimming the lights or putting candles on tables, changing the music playlists and perhaps serving more substantial or complex meals.

    From Cafe to Café Bar!

    The furniture is an important feature for letting your customers understand your offer. The vintage industrial concept of interior is just perfect for this type of venue. Appealing to the demographic section of the population showing growth in spending, it is both stylish for daytime eating and transforms in cool Britannia for an early doors evening trade for our millennials.

    Zoned soft seating areas for relaxing with friends and family are easily achieved using the Pub Stuff Lisbon or Devon tub chairs upholstered in fabrics and leathers combining cheekily with the Spitfire chair and Jesterfield sofa to add zest and zing to any scheme.  Eclectic mixing of wooden chairs such as the Ohio or Chapel chair with new metal additions like the Xavier or Soho chairs add interest and ensure a look that has evolved over time rather than slaps you in the face as ‘just refurbed!’. Shabby chic without the hassle of sourcing individual items and with the surety of commercial grade (often called ‘contract grade’) furniture.

    Tables to complement this look range from the farmhouse chunky tables with painted bases or Rustic distressed table tops on cast bases such as the Verona or Milan.

    Raw natural wall, ceiling and floor finishes are best here with bare brick and original tiles and floorboards left for all to see.  Large steel, copper or cast black station lights complete the look.

    If you would like us to help you create this type of style – ask about the Pub Stuff Proplanner design service.

     

  • The Chesterfield Sofa

    The chesterfield sofa is not just a piece of furniture but a piece of history.

    There are many opinions on the origin of the word "chesterfield" as a description of the item we now know as such. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the use of the word chesterfield was already used in England in the 1800's to describe a leather couch.

    It is believed that Lord Phillip Stanhope, the 4th Earl of Chesterfield (1694-1773), commissioned the first leather chesterfield settee with its distinctive deep buttoned, quilted leather upholstery and low seat base. Aside from being a much-admired politician and writer, patron of Voltaire, the Earl was a known trendsetter. Apparently the Earl requested a local craftsman to construct a piece of furniture that would allow a gentleman to sit upright in the utmost of comfort allowing sitting without wrinkling the garment. This was the original purpose of the chesterfield sofa with its characteristic deep buttoned upholstery, rolled arms, equal back and arm height and nail head trim. There has never been any solid confirmation of this noble beginning; however, this namesake is certainly appropriate. Lord Stanhope was a noted writer of letters to his illegitimate son, extolling all method of manners and morals. The Chesterfield sofa is certainly a refined and mannerly example of seating.

    Legend has it that in March 24th, 1773 when the nobleman passed away his very last words were directed to his personal butler. The old Earl didn’t forget his good manners while he was in his deathbed so when a friend came to visit him he ordered to his manservant: "Give Mr. Dayrolles a chair" just before expiring. The servant took Lord Stanhope at his word and waving away protests, insisted that Stanhope’s godson Dayrolles, a budding young diplomat who had come to enquire after the elderly man’s health, take the armchair with him. After carrying the heavy chair back home, Mr. Dayrolles had a proper look at the chair: a magnificent piece of work in deep brown leather, indented with large, deeply set buttons. The years of wear had served to lend the item an even more attractive appearance. It was an ageless and timeless masterpiece.

    After that episode we have to imagine Dayrolles acquaintances commissioning similar chairs for themselves as a natural reaction to the great admiration caused by the first chesterfield armchair.

    The characteristic leather sofa retained its distinguished charm over the years, but remained firmly ensconced in the Gentlemen’s Clubs of London for a long time. All the colour schemes and successive models (sofas, settees, window seats, rocking chairs, etc.) that have been designed over the last 200 years are all directly inspired by the original.

    Successfully exported trough the colonies of the British Empire by the officials of the Royal Army (U.S.A, Canada, Australia…) it soon became a worldwide peerless emblem of British style. The chesterfield sofa conjures images of formally attired gentlemen sequestered in a dark panelled study, sipping brandy and smoking cigars. The Victorian era saw the chesterfield as the key piece in living rooms, where gentlemen relaxed while their wives sat in chairs crafting needlepoint. Since the 19th century it has also been linked with Freudian psychoanalysis, as Sigmund Freud originally used a sofa during his hypnosis sessions with patients.

    Throughout the years, chesterfield sofas have graced the palaces of royalty, prominent business offices, hotels, restaurants, gentleman's clubs and luxurious private homes.? The chesterfield is synonymous with elegance and class in interiors all over the world, of every architectural and decorating style.? Regardless of what it represents to many, the chesterfield steadfastly remains the sofa that embodies the perfect blend of comfort and sophistication.

    What was once a status symbol of the elite is now a much sought-after addition to the modern home or business. History notwithstanding, Chesterfield sofas will remain forever the epitome of luxury, class and style. Nowhere will you find a more recognized, timeless example of furniture. Chesterfields have been popping up in home decor blogs and magazines for the last decades, some genuinely classic and others re-imagined in mid-century or more modern styles. What was old is new again. Adopted by antiques enthusiasts looking for a retro look but also by rock and pop groups, the vintage icon is reborn in a wide range of editions.

    Whatever the future of this harmonious courtship of refined structure and luxurious comfort, the chesterfield sofa is sure to remain in demand for centuries to come.

    Source:  http://www.londongallery.net/en/content/8-history-of-chesterfield

    So grab yourself a bit of history and affordable quality with the chesterfield range from Pub Stuff. This range is happy at home in the most traditional of settings but equally looks amazing in modern clubs and restaurants.  We’ve seen a real upsurge in this styles’ popularity as the craze for vintage tinged industrial and distressed interiors continues.  It just goes to show when there’s a classic style in town everybody wants it.

  • Ben Jonson

    A warm welcome feeling

    When I walked through the door of the newly refurbished Ben Jonson pub at Weston on the Green Oxfordshire I was greeted with a wide smile from the manager and an offer of ‘would you like a coffee, we’re just trying out the new machine’.  Straight away it’s easy to see why this pub has seen  phenomenal success over it’s opening few days.  I was there just to take some photos of the interior as Pub Stuff had supplied all the new furniture but received a welcome as though I was the best customer they had ever seen!

    "For a split moment i felt as though i was the best customer they had ever seen"

    Pub Makeover and redesign

    The pub has received a beautiful makeover from new paint work throughout, and redecoration of every area including the loos.  The furniture was carefully chosen to reflect the character period charm of the building with its nooks and crannies but given contemporary stylish finishes including planked table tops and geometric fabrics.  The thoughtful zoning creates a stand-alone bar area with low stools and traditional Chapel chairs, a beautiful snug complete with leather Chesterfield Wing chairs and a comfortable restaurant.

    Modern contemporary pub furniture added to the experience

    The chairs are comfortable most with padded backs and seats, with the Lisbon comfy chairs looking particularly attractive upholstered in coordinating and contrasting fabrics and leathers giving a style that looks as though it has evolved over time in an eclectic manner.  A mixture of round tables and square sided modular tables ensure each space is used to its maximum potential both in terms of the aesthetic quality and the operational seating arrangements. Painted table bases accentuate the country kitchen effect of the scheme.

    We wish the Ben Jonson every success, it’s been a pleasure to be a part of this stylish project.

  • Encourage Your Customers Outside This Summer with Stylish Outdoor Furniture

    Tempting Fate by Putting your Garden Furniture Out Now?

    "Button to chin, till May be in,
    Cast not a clout till May be out"

    This is the longer and fuller version of a rhyme we’re all familiar with.  Thought to date back to the 16th century there is never a truer word spoken.  Tempted as we may be to ‘cast a clout’ or take off our winter clothes and dust off the outdoor furniture when we get a warm spell in April or early May: inevitably a frost will follow and chill the air again, plus kill off all the seedlings foolishly  planted by inexperienced gardeners lulled into thinking summer had arrived after a day or so of milky May sunshine.

    Outdoor Garden Furniture for Every Venue

    But come the end of May and we should be pretty safe, to think about final preparations for our summer (touching wood, fingers crossed!).  The garden, of course, comes to mind with our customers heading to the great outdoors, pint in hand and probably a bit too much white flesh on show.

    To help really spruce things up, the all new Pub Stuff Florence garden set is in stock and ready to go.

    Made from sustainable wood it has a 900x900 square tables easily big enough for 4, and 4 stackable comfortable chairs with arms. From £229 per set.

    Sprucing up your outdoor space will help you maximise the potential of any good weather.

    Outdoor Furniture with Panache

    If your venue is a little more ‘funky’ then try the Rio sets which are incredible value at just £179.99 for 4 complete sets of dining tables and chairs which includes delivery.

    And for your  ‘seen and be seen’ customers then how about the Rio Poseur tables and chair.  Neat and compact it will entice the most discernible sun worshippers and the price is almost too good to be true at just £59.99 per set.

    Add a Party 9 and get your garden party started.

    It’s time to ‘Cast a Clout’…..

     

  • Fun in the summer sun

    In the words of one of the best songs ever written – Throw Those Curtains Wide! It’s summer and we all need a breath of warm fresh air.

    It’s the season for emerging from our sitting rooms and finally getting around to jogging in the park (for a few weeks anyway!) and it’s the season for our pubs and restaurants to introduce Summer season food and drink. Prosecco is flying off the shelves and as customers stray further and further from the bar into the street or into the garden the Pub Stuff Party 9 really comes into its own.

    Fill the lightweight tub with eight pints of your customers’ favourite beer or punch, clip it back onto the stand over the ice cooler block and watch them have a ball as they help themselves from the three separate dispensing points.

    Why your customers love the Party 9:

    • Only one person has to do the journey to the bar
    • Drinks stay cool for well over an hour
    • It’s FUN!

    Why you love the Party 9:

    • You sell 9 pints in every transaction
    • Only one person at your bar instead of 9
    • There’s an instant party atmosphere where there’s a Pub Stuff Party 9

  • Differences between and Irish Bar and an English Pub

    It seems that every city all over the world has their own Irish Bar: there’s Healy Mac’s in Kuala Lumpur, Emmet’s in Boston and you’ll find the aptly named Shamrock in Rome.  You know what you’ll get at these venues making them totally great for customer confidence and comfort and ensuring a perfect pint of Guinness – whatever the weather.

    The décor is usually pretty predictable (not a bad thing!) with dark wood poseur tables and high stools, chunky dining tables and mix of padded and wooden seat chairs. Big portions of traditional fayre such as Pie, Battered fish, and very often the international staple of pizza.

    Add lots of bric-a-brac and pictures on the walls, great staff with big smiles and open all hours and you’ve got an Irish Bar.

    An English pub is a whole different ball game. There are so many variables but there are definitely some consistent features which would be ‘typical’.  In the main English pubs tend to have different zones for different activities such as drinking, dining, gaming and lounging.  By breaking up the space visitors will know what is expected in each area adding a comfortable confident feel to each. Harder edged chairs and stools in the bar with High table and stools in the gaming areas, dining height tables and chairs for the restaurant and lower comfy chairs and coffee tables for a casual lounge. It’s a natural descendant from the past distinction between the tap bar and the ‘lounge’ which were quite separate both in terms of décor and clientele. By the 20th century, the saloon, or lounge bar, had become a ‘middle-class’ room carpets on the floor, cushions on the seats, and a penny or two on the prices, while the public bar, or tap room, remained male blue collar dominated with bare boards, sometimes with sawdust to absorb the spitting and spillages (known as "spit and sawdust"), hard bench seats, and cheap beer.

    Later, the public bars gradually improved until sometimes almost the only difference was in the prices, so that customers could choose between economy and exclusivity (or youth and age, or a jukebox or dartboard). With the blurring of class divisions in the 1960s and 1970s, the distinction between the saloon and the public bar was often seen as archaic, and was frequently abolished, usually by the removal of the dividing wall or partition. While the names of saloon and public bar may still be seen on the doors of pubs, the prices (and often the standard of furnishings and decoration) are the same throughout the premises, and many pubs now comprise one large room. However, the modern importance of dining in pubs encourages some establishments to maintain distinct rooms or areas.

  • Lets’ Dance around the maypole this weekend

    May Day is still celebrated in many villages with the crowning of the May Queen. The gentlemen of the village may also been found celebrating with Jack-in-the-Green, otherwise found on the signs of pubs across the country called the Green Man.

    May Day traditions in southern England include the Hobby Horses that still rampage through the towns of Dunster and Minehead in Somerset, and Padstow in Cornwall. The horse or the Oss, as it is normally called is a local person dressed in flowing robes wearing a mask with a grotesque, but colourful, caricature of a horse.

    In Oxford, May Day morning is celebrated from the top of Magdalen College Tower by the singing of a Latin hymn, or carol, of thanksgiving. After this the college bells signal the start of the Morris Dancing in the streets below.

    Further north in Castleton, Derbyshire, Oak Apple Day takes place on 29th May, commemorating the restoration of Charles II to throne. Followers within the procession carry sprigs of oak, recalling the story that in exile King Charles hid in an oak tree to avoid capture by his enemies.

    The May Day festivities all but vanished following the Civil War when Oliver Cromwell and his Puritans took control of the country in 1645. Describing maypole dancing as ‘a heathenish vanity generally abused to superstition and wickedness’, legislation was passed which saw the end of village maypoles throughout the country.

    Dancing did not return to the village greens until the restoration of Charles II. ‘The Merry Monarch’ helped ensure the support of his subjects with the erection of a massive 40 metre high maypole in London’s Strand. This pole signalled the return of the fun times, and remained standing for almost fifty years.

    Maypoles can still be seen on the village greens at Welford-on-Avon and at Dunchurch, Warwickshire, both of which stand all year round. Barwick in Yorkshire, claims the largest maypole in England, standing some 30 meters in height.

    It is important to remember that without ‘The Merry Monarch’ May Day celebrations might have come to a premature end in 1660. So if you are celebrating this heathenish vanity next weekend at the Green Man or The Royal Oak ensure your customers are comfortable with sturdy chairs such as the Pub Stuff Luigi or Lisbon in a green fabric. They look great in a country pub or restaurant especially paired with traditional painted tables.

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